EASY CHEDDAR SOURDOUGH BREAD

November 14, 2019
The sourdough style comes from a mixture of Greek dairy product and soured cream that ferments the dough instead of employing a starter. The longer you let the dough rise (ferment), the a lot of sourdough-ey the bread tastes.

If you’ve ever created bread, this formula are a snap. A lot of easier than cinnamon rolls, sweet rolls, or dinner rolls, by an extended shot. The formula appearance long however I write yeast recipes with the maximum amount detail and provides as several tips as attainable to line you up for fulfillment . 

EASY CHEDDAR SOURDOUGH BREAD
EASY CHEDDAR SOURDOUGH BREAD

While it’s not imperative to bake the bread in Dutch kitchen appliance, it extremely helps develop sourdough’s signature crusty crust as a result of a lined Dutch kitchen appliance traps within the steam the bread releases whereas baking, aiding in crust development. If you don’t have a Dutch kitchen appliance, a forged iron pan or heavy-bottomed pan can work, though you'll sacrifice a number of the crustiness.

The bread is hearty, satisfying, and includes a firm crust that provides was to an excellent wet, soft interior with ample hunks of cheese. The cheese may be a excellent complement to the sourdough and extremely enhances the lemonlike issue.

The bread will extremely arise to bold-flavored cheese therefore don’t be back employing a robust, daring cheese.

EASY CHEDDAR SOURDOUGH BREAD

INGREDIENTS:

  • 3 cups bread flour (I use King Arthur)
  • one-17.6 ounce (500 gram) tub plain unsweetened Greek yogurt with active cultures (must say ‘active cultures’, I used 0% Non-Fat Fage)
  • about 1/2 to 1 cup sour cream (or Greek yogurt, lite versions are okay), or as needed see below step 1
  • 1 teaspoon salt, or to taste
  • scant 1 teaspoon (just slightly less than 1 teaspoon) instant dry yeast (I use Red Star Platinum) for 6 to 12 hours rising (use closer to 1/2 teaspoon yeast if you plan to allow dough to rise for 12-18 hours; see step 4 below)
  • about 4 ounces cheddar cheese, diced in 1/2-inch cubes (I used Kerrygold Red Leicester, try your favorite)

INSTRUCTIONS :

  1. To the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the dough hook (or use a large mixing bowl and wooden spoon and your hands), add the flour, Greek yogurt, 1/2 cup sour cream, salt, and yeast.
  2. Turn mixer on low speed and allow it to knead dough for about 5 to 7 minutes (about 7 to 10 minutes by hand using a wooden spoon and then switching to your hands). Add sour cream as needed to form a very moist and wet dough. If it’s at all dry or crumbly, add more sour cream (or Greek yogurt) until it comes together. I used one-17.6 ounce tub of Greek yogurt and almost 1 cup lite sour cream. Dough will be seem like it’s almost too wet and it’s very heavy, but this is what you want. Err on the side of wetter than drier because flour and yeast love moisture when rising.
  3. Remove dough from the mixing bowl, spray a large bowl with cooking spray, pat dough into a round ball, place it in the bowl, and flip it over once so it’s lightly oiled on both top and bottom. It will look like a dimply head of cauliflower.
  4. Cover bowl with plasticwrap (spray it with cooking spray in case dough rises high enough to touch it) and place bowl in a warm, draft-free place to rise for about 6 to 8+ hours (I did 9 hours), or doubled in size. If you want to start this before work or before bed and made as an overnight dough and it’ll go 8-10 hours, that’s fine (I started it before bed and finished in the morning). There’s really no harm in letting it rise for up to 18 hours and the longer you let it go, the more of a classic sourdough/fermented flavor that will develop. If you suspect you’re going to allow it to rise on the longer side (12-18 hours), reduce yeast to about 1/2 teaspoon so dough doesn’t get too puffy and overflow the bowl.
  5. After 6+ hours of rising, turn dough out onto a floured surface (without punching it down to preserve the air pockets and bubbles that have been created) and knead lightly for about 2 to 3 minutes.
  6. With your fingers, make a flat 8 to 10-inch oval, evenly sprinkle with cheese. Tuck in sides so cheese is fully contained and pat into a round mound. Make sure cheese is fully enclosed and contained or it will burn.
  7. Place mound back into large mixing bowl, seam side down. Cover with plastic wrap, and allow to rise for 60 to 120 minutes, or until doubled in size (I did 75 minutes; I suspect the longer you let the second rise go, the more ‘holey’ the bread will be). Placing the bowl on the stovetop is a nice spot for this rise because you’re going to turn on the oven and the residual heat emitted helps with rising.
  8. Shortly after dough begins the 60-120 minute rising, turn oven on to 450F and place a covered Dutch oven (empty) or heavy-bottomed skillet into the oven and allow it to heat for about 45 minutes. Dutch ovens are so heavy and take so long to get truly hot, and when you’re ready to bake the bread, you want the Dutch oven screaming hot.
  9. After about 60-90 minutes or dough has doubled in size, remove Dutch oven from oven (careful, it’s screaming hot, use two pairs of hot mitts) and carefully place a piece of parchment paper on the bottom of Dutch oven to prevent bread from sticking.
  10. Carefully transfer dough from rising bowl to Dutch oven, cover it, and bake covered for 30 minutes. Don’t open the oven door or the Dutch oven lid to peek; you want to seal in the steam.
  11. After 30 minutes, uncover the Dutch oven, and allow bread to bake uncovered for 5 to 10 minutes (I did 8 minutes) or until it’s as browned as desired. Traditional sourdough has a darker crust than most bread (sometimes almost burnt-looking, but I prefer mine on the lighter side).
  12. Remove Dutch oven from oven, and remove bread from Dutch oven. Place it on a wire rack to cool completely before slicing. As tempting as it is, don’t slice too early because the cooling process is important and should be considered an important extension of the baking process. Slice or break off hunks, and serve with butter, jam, hummus,  cheese, cheese spread, dip, etc. Bread is best fresh, but will keep airtight at room temp for up to 3 days. Older bread may be better toasted or make as grilled cheese.


The sourdough style comes from a mixture of Greek dairy product and soured cream that ferments the dough instead of employing a starter. The longer you let the dough rise (ferment), the a lot of sourdough-ey the bread tastes.

If you’ve ever created bread, this formula are a snap. A lot of easier than cinnamon rolls, sweet rolls, or dinner rolls, by an extended shot. The formula appearance long however I write yeast recipes with the maximum amount detail and provides as several tips as attainable to line you up for fulfillment . 

EASY CHEDDAR SOURDOUGH BREAD
EASY CHEDDAR SOURDOUGH BREAD

While it’s not imperative to bake the bread in Dutch kitchen appliance, it extremely helps develop sourdough’s signature crusty crust as a result of a lined Dutch kitchen appliance traps within the steam the bread releases whereas baking, aiding in crust development. If you don’t have a Dutch kitchen appliance, a forged iron pan or heavy-bottomed pan can work, though you'll sacrifice a number of the crustiness.

The bread is hearty, satisfying, and includes a firm crust that provides was to an excellent wet, soft interior with ample hunks of cheese. The cheese may be a excellent complement to the sourdough and extremely enhances the lemonlike issue.

The bread will extremely arise to bold-flavored cheese therefore don’t be back employing a robust, daring cheese.

EASY CHEDDAR SOURDOUGH BREAD

INGREDIENTS:

  • 3 cups bread flour (I use King Arthur)
  • one-17.6 ounce (500 gram) tub plain unsweetened Greek yogurt with active cultures (must say ‘active cultures’, I used 0% Non-Fat Fage)
  • about 1/2 to 1 cup sour cream (or Greek yogurt, lite versions are okay), or as needed see below step 1
  • 1 teaspoon salt, or to taste
  • scant 1 teaspoon (just slightly less than 1 teaspoon) instant dry yeast (I use Red Star Platinum) for 6 to 12 hours rising (use closer to 1/2 teaspoon yeast if you plan to allow dough to rise for 12-18 hours; see step 4 below)
  • about 4 ounces cheddar cheese, diced in 1/2-inch cubes (I used Kerrygold Red Leicester, try your favorite)

INSTRUCTIONS :

  1. To the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the dough hook (or use a large mixing bowl and wooden spoon and your hands), add the flour, Greek yogurt, 1/2 cup sour cream, salt, and yeast.
  2. Turn mixer on low speed and allow it to knead dough for about 5 to 7 minutes (about 7 to 10 minutes by hand using a wooden spoon and then switching to your hands). Add sour cream as needed to form a very moist and wet dough. If it’s at all dry or crumbly, add more sour cream (or Greek yogurt) until it comes together. I used one-17.6 ounce tub of Greek yogurt and almost 1 cup lite sour cream. Dough will be seem like it’s almost too wet and it’s very heavy, but this is what you want. Err on the side of wetter than drier because flour and yeast love moisture when rising.
  3. Remove dough from the mixing bowl, spray a large bowl with cooking spray, pat dough into a round ball, place it in the bowl, and flip it over once so it’s lightly oiled on both top and bottom. It will look like a dimply head of cauliflower.
  4. Cover bowl with plasticwrap (spray it with cooking spray in case dough rises high enough to touch it) and place bowl in a warm, draft-free place to rise for about 6 to 8+ hours (I did 9 hours), or doubled in size. If you want to start this before work or before bed and made as an overnight dough and it’ll go 8-10 hours, that’s fine (I started it before bed and finished in the morning). There’s really no harm in letting it rise for up to 18 hours and the longer you let it go, the more of a classic sourdough/fermented flavor that will develop. If you suspect you’re going to allow it to rise on the longer side (12-18 hours), reduce yeast to about 1/2 teaspoon so dough doesn’t get too puffy and overflow the bowl.
  5. After 6+ hours of rising, turn dough out onto a floured surface (without punching it down to preserve the air pockets and bubbles that have been created) and knead lightly for about 2 to 3 minutes.
  6. With your fingers, make a flat 8 to 10-inch oval, evenly sprinkle with cheese. Tuck in sides so cheese is fully contained and pat into a round mound. Make sure cheese is fully enclosed and contained or it will burn.
  7. Place mound back into large mixing bowl, seam side down. Cover with plastic wrap, and allow to rise for 60 to 120 minutes, or until doubled in size (I did 75 minutes; I suspect the longer you let the second rise go, the more ‘holey’ the bread will be). Placing the bowl on the stovetop is a nice spot for this rise because you’re going to turn on the oven and the residual heat emitted helps with rising.
  8. Shortly after dough begins the 60-120 minute rising, turn oven on to 450F and place a covered Dutch oven (empty) or heavy-bottomed skillet into the oven and allow it to heat for about 45 minutes. Dutch ovens are so heavy and take so long to get truly hot, and when you’re ready to bake the bread, you want the Dutch oven screaming hot.
  9. After about 60-90 minutes or dough has doubled in size, remove Dutch oven from oven (careful, it’s screaming hot, use two pairs of hot mitts) and carefully place a piece of parchment paper on the bottom of Dutch oven to prevent bread from sticking.
  10. Carefully transfer dough from rising bowl to Dutch oven, cover it, and bake covered for 30 minutes. Don’t open the oven door or the Dutch oven lid to peek; you want to seal in the steam.
  11. After 30 minutes, uncover the Dutch oven, and allow bread to bake uncovered for 5 to 10 minutes (I did 8 minutes) or until it’s as browned as desired. Traditional sourdough has a darker crust than most bread (sometimes almost burnt-looking, but I prefer mine on the lighter side).
  12. Remove Dutch oven from oven, and remove bread from Dutch oven. Place it on a wire rack to cool completely before slicing. As tempting as it is, don’t slice too early because the cooling process is important and should be considered an important extension of the baking process. Slice or break off hunks, and serve with butter, jam, hummus,  cheese, cheese spread, dip, etc. Bread is best fresh, but will keep airtight at room temp for up to 3 days. Older bread may be better toasted or make as grilled cheese.


The sourdough style comes from a mixture of Greek dairy product and soured cream that ferments the dough instead of employing a starter. The longer you let the dough rise (ferment), the a lot of sourdough-ey the bread tastes.

If you’ve ever created bread, this formula are a snap. A lot of easier than cinnamon rolls, sweet rolls, or dinner rolls, by an extended shot. The formula appearance long however I write yeast recipes with the maximum amount detail and provides as several tips as attainable to line you up for fulfillment . 

EASY CHEDDAR SOURDOUGH BREAD
EASY CHEDDAR SOURDOUGH BREAD

While it’s not imperative to bake the bread in Dutch kitchen appliance, it extremely helps develop sourdough’s signature crusty crust as a result of a lined Dutch kitchen appliance traps within the steam the bread releases whereas baking, aiding in crust development. If you don’t have a Dutch kitchen appliance, a forged iron pan or heavy-bottomed pan can work, though you'll sacrifice a number of the crustiness.

The bread is hearty, satisfying, and includes a firm crust that provides was to an excellent wet, soft interior with ample hunks of cheese. The cheese may be a excellent complement to the sourdough and extremely enhances the lemonlike issue.

The bread will extremely arise to bold-flavored cheese therefore don’t be back employing a robust, daring cheese.

EASY CHEDDAR SOURDOUGH BREAD

INGREDIENTS:

  • 3 cups bread flour (I use King Arthur)
  • one-17.6 ounce (500 gram) tub plain unsweetened Greek yogurt with active cultures (must say ‘active cultures’, I used 0% Non-Fat Fage)
  • about 1/2 to 1 cup sour cream (or Greek yogurt, lite versions are okay), or as needed see below step 1
  • 1 teaspoon salt, or to taste
  • scant 1 teaspoon (just slightly less than 1 teaspoon) instant dry yeast (I use Red Star Platinum) for 6 to 12 hours rising (use closer to 1/2 teaspoon yeast if you plan to allow dough to rise for 12-18 hours; see step 4 below)
  • about 4 ounces cheddar cheese, diced in 1/2-inch cubes (I used Kerrygold Red Leicester, try your favorite)

INSTRUCTIONS :

  1. To the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the dough hook (or use a large mixing bowl and wooden spoon and your hands), add the flour, Greek yogurt, 1/2 cup sour cream, salt, and yeast.
  2. Turn mixer on low speed and allow it to knead dough for about 5 to 7 minutes (about 7 to 10 minutes by hand using a wooden spoon and then switching to your hands). Add sour cream as needed to form a very moist and wet dough. If it’s at all dry or crumbly, add more sour cream (or Greek yogurt) until it comes together. I used one-17.6 ounce tub of Greek yogurt and almost 1 cup lite sour cream. Dough will be seem like it’s almost too wet and it’s very heavy, but this is what you want. Err on the side of wetter than drier because flour and yeast love moisture when rising.
  3. Remove dough from the mixing bowl, spray a large bowl with cooking spray, pat dough into a round ball, place it in the bowl, and flip it over once so it’s lightly oiled on both top and bottom. It will look like a dimply head of cauliflower.
  4. Cover bowl with plasticwrap (spray it with cooking spray in case dough rises high enough to touch it) and place bowl in a warm, draft-free place to rise for about 6 to 8+ hours (I did 9 hours), or doubled in size. If you want to start this before work or before bed and made as an overnight dough and it’ll go 8-10 hours, that’s fine (I started it before bed and finished in the morning). There’s really no harm in letting it rise for up to 18 hours and the longer you let it go, the more of a classic sourdough/fermented flavor that will develop. If you suspect you’re going to allow it to rise on the longer side (12-18 hours), reduce yeast to about 1/2 teaspoon so dough doesn’t get too puffy and overflow the bowl.
  5. After 6+ hours of rising, turn dough out onto a floured surface (without punching it down to preserve the air pockets and bubbles that have been created) and knead lightly for about 2 to 3 minutes.
  6. With your fingers, make a flat 8 to 10-inch oval, evenly sprinkle with cheese. Tuck in sides so cheese is fully contained and pat into a round mound. Make sure cheese is fully enclosed and contained or it will burn.
  7. Place mound back into large mixing bowl, seam side down. Cover with plastic wrap, and allow to rise for 60 to 120 minutes, or until doubled in size (I did 75 minutes; I suspect the longer you let the second rise go, the more ‘holey’ the bread will be). Placing the bowl on the stovetop is a nice spot for this rise because you’re going to turn on the oven and the residual heat emitted helps with rising.
  8. Shortly after dough begins the 60-120 minute rising, turn oven on to 450F and place a covered Dutch oven (empty) or heavy-bottomed skillet into the oven and allow it to heat for about 45 minutes. Dutch ovens are so heavy and take so long to get truly hot, and when you’re ready to bake the bread, you want the Dutch oven screaming hot.
  9. After about 60-90 minutes or dough has doubled in size, remove Dutch oven from oven (careful, it’s screaming hot, use two pairs of hot mitts) and carefully place a piece of parchment paper on the bottom of Dutch oven to prevent bread from sticking.
  10. Carefully transfer dough from rising bowl to Dutch oven, cover it, and bake covered for 30 minutes. Don’t open the oven door or the Dutch oven lid to peek; you want to seal in the steam.
  11. After 30 minutes, uncover the Dutch oven, and allow bread to bake uncovered for 5 to 10 minutes (I did 8 minutes) or until it’s as browned as desired. Traditional sourdough has a darker crust than most bread (sometimes almost burnt-looking, but I prefer mine on the lighter side).
  12. Remove Dutch oven from oven, and remove bread from Dutch oven. Place it on a wire rack to cool completely before slicing. As tempting as it is, don’t slice too early because the cooling process is important and should be considered an important extension of the baking process. Slice or break off hunks, and serve with butter, jam, hummus,  cheese, cheese spread, dip, etc. Bread is best fresh, but will keep airtight at room temp for up to 3 days. Older bread may be better toasted or make as grilled cheese.


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